Adams-Clermont Solid Waste District’s Educational Campaign Showcased by Ohio EPA

The Adams-Clermont Solid Waste District’s efforts to promote proper recycling at its 45 public drop-off sites has been catching residents attention for a while, and also recently caught the attention of the Ohio EPA (OEPA). The Solid Waste District’s successful ongoing campaign was featured in the OEPA’s “Scraps of Wisdom” winter newsletter, which shares program highlights, best practices, and case studies for solid waste management districts and local health departments.” To read the full version of the OEPA newsletter article  CLICK HERE

tips for PROPER BATTERY DISPOSAL

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You may have seen some messages from Rumpke recently about battery disposal. Read on to find out what you are supposed to do with your spent batteries in Clermont County or Adams County, regardless of what trash service you use.

Alkaline batteries are single use, non-rechargeable, and are typically AAA, AA, C, D, and 9V sizes. Alkaline batteries will say “alkaline” on the battery. Alkaline batteries are ok to throw away in the trash. Check the batteries to be sure they do not say “lithium” or “rechargeable” before throwing away. Tape the terminals of 9V batteries before throwing away. Throw the batteries out as you use them. No need to collect them for special disposal. If you have a large collection you need to throw away, throw them into your bags of household trash a handful at a time. Do not place alkaline batteries in your recycling.

NEVER place lithium or rechargeable batteries in the trash or recycling. Lithium or rechargeable batteries come in may forms, from many kinds of battery powered devices. Lithium and rechargeable batteries can be AAA, AA, C, D, and 9V sizes, looking the same as alkaline batteries if you don’t pay close attention. These batteries will be labeled as “lithium” or “rechargeable” if they are not alkaline. Other types of lithium and rechargeable batteries can be found in

  • Cell phones
  • Computers
  • Tablets
  • Children’s toys
  • Electric scooters
  • Vape pens and e-cigs
  • Cameras
  • Power tools
  • Lawn care equipment
  • Medical equipment
  • Hearing aid button batteries

Placing lithium or rechargeable batteries in your trash or recycling causes devastating fires inside collection trucks and at facilities. Instead, you must dispose of lithium or rechargeable batteries by taking them to Lowes, Best Buy, or for a fee, Batteries Plus Bulbs. Some stores which sell products with lithium or rechargeable batteries will have a special collection box for these batteries near their customer service desk. Call the store you plan to go to before heading over to confirm that they are running a lithium/rechargeable battery collection program.

If you have a business that regularly generates spent lithium or rechargeable batteries, you can look into purchasing your own battery disposal box from Call2Recycle. Once you fill the box, you can just ship it back to Call2Recycle.

Lead-acid car batteries never go in the trash or recycling. Ohio law requires anyone who sells car batteries to take old ones back. Contact your preferred auto service provider for car battery drop-off information.

Do you have other materials lying around your house that you need to dispose of, but don’t know how to do it properly? Check out this page for all things recycling and disposal in Adams and Clermont County  http://oeqrecycle.clermontcountyohio.gov/tree/

ADAMS COUNTY TIRE DISPOSAL EVENT: Wednesday October 19, 2022 from 10am – 6pm

This year’s Adams County tire collection day will be held on Wednesday October 19, 2022 from 10AM – 6PM at the Adams County Waste and Recycle Station, located at 95 Trefz Road, West Union, Ohio 45693.

This event is a good opportunity for residents to dispose of up to 10 scrap tires that were accumulated from personal use, illegally dumped on their property, or were on their property when they purchased it. Tires can only be accepted from Clermont County or Adams County households only, meaning no tires from businesses (auto dealers or repair shops, trucking companies, etc.) will be accepted.

A disposal fee for each tire will be collected (in cash) from the resident at the time of unloading. Disposal fees are as follows:

TIRE TYPE FEE
standard passenger car/truck tire $1.00
semi truck/trailer tire $10.00
tractor tire (larger than 4 feet in diameter must be cut) $20.00
rubber tracks not accepted

Tires mounted on rims will be accepted, but please keep them separated from the off-rim tires in your vehicle for ease of sorting at the drop-off site. No additional fees will be imposed for rims. Rubber equipment tracks (from skid steers, etc.) cannot be accepted.

Important note: Residents will be responsible for unloading all tires they bring to the drop-off site – it is recommended that you bring someone to help you unload.

Although the Adams-Clermont Solid Waste District has been able to hold tire collection events at various locations throughout the county for the past several years, there is no guarantee that funding will be available for future events. Most tire retailers and tire installers will gladly accept and properly dispose of your scrap tires for a small fee. We highly encourage you to take advantage of their services in the future when you purchase new tires. Tires can also be disposed of year round at the Adams County Waste and Recycle Station (95 Trefz Road, West Union, Ohio 45693) for only 12 cents per pound.

If you have any questions regarding this event please call Doug Snyder at (513)732-7744 or email at dsnyder@ClermontCountyOhio.gov

CLERMONT COUNTY TIRE DISPOSAL EVENT: Friday/Saturday November 18 – November 19, 2022

This year’s Clermont County tire collection days will be held on Friday November 18 and Saturday November 19, 2022 from 8AM – 2PM at the Neville Public Boat Ramp, located on Morgan Street, just off of US 52 in the Village of Neville.

DIRECTIONS: Traffic will enter the site from US 52 via Morgan Street, and exit the site back onto US 52 via Coffee Street.

This event is a good opportunity for residents to dispose of up to 10 scrap tires that were accumulated from personal use, illegally dumped on their property, or were on their property when they purchased it. Tires can only be accepted from Clermont County or Adams County households only, meaning no tires from businesses (auto dealers or repair shops, trucking companies, etc.) will be accepted.

A disposal fee for each tire will be collected (in cash) from the resident at the time of unloading. Disposal fees are as follows:

TIRE TYPE FEE
standard passenger car/truck tire $1.00
semi truck/trailer tire $10.00
tractor tire (larger than 4 feet in diameter must be cut) $20.00
rubber tracks not accepted

Tires mounted on rims will be accepted, but please keep them separated from the off-rim tires in your vehicle for ease of sorting at the drop-off site. No additional fees will be imposed for rims. Rubber equipment tracks (from skid steers, etc.) cannot be accepted.

Important note: Residents will be responsible for unloading all tires they bring to the drop-off site – it is recommended that you bring someone to help you unload.

Although the Adams-Clermont Solid Waste District has been able to hold tire collection events at various locations throughout the county for the past several years, there is no guarantee that funding will be available for future events. Most tire retailers and tire installers will gladly accept and properly dispose of your scrap tires for a small fee. We highly encourage you to take advantage of their services in the future when you purchase new tires. Tires can also be disposed of year round at the Adams County Waste and Recycle Station (95 Trefz Road, West Union, Ohio 45693) for only 12 cents per pound.

If you have any questions regarding this event please call Doug Snyder at (513)732-7744 or email at dsnyder@ClermontCountyOhio.gov

No Bags in Recycling Bins

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Plastic bags do not go in curbside or drop-off recycling bins! Trash bags and shopping bags cannot be recycled at the facilities we send our recyclables to. When bags go to our recycling facilities, they can tangle on the sorting equipment and cause it to break down. Remove your recyclables from bags when you put them in the bin.

Although plastic shopping bags cannot be recycled through our curbside or drop-off recycling programs, recycling your bags is still possible through special programs. Try bringing your shopping bags to a grocery or department store for recycling. Many stores have plastic bag recycling bins just inside their entryways. Make sure your bags are clean and dry before dropping them off at a store recycling program.

 

Example of an in-store plastic bag recycling program

Environmental Champion Paul Braasch Retires from Clermont County

BATAVIA, Ohio – Paul Braasch, a champion for the environment in Clermont County and throughout Ohio, is retiring after 25 years at Clermont County, as Director of the Adams-Clermont Solid Waste District and the county’s  Office of Environmental Quality.

Braasch has had an enormous impact on Clermont County as an advocate for recycling, water quality, and environmental stewardship. His success, he says, lies in his ability to bring people to the table and work together.

Braasch, who graduated with a Bachelor of Science in agriculture from the University of Kentucky, developed expertise in recycling when he worked in the 1980s at Adams Brown Recycling in Georgetown, now the largest non-profit recycler in the State of Ohio. Later, as an employee with SCS Engineers, an environmental consulting firm, they wrote solid waste plans for 19 counties throughout Ohio as the Ohio Legislature required. “I wrote the Adams-Clermont Solid Waste Plan and then I was recruited to come to Clermont County,” he said. He began his career at the county in 1993.

Braasch’s interest in the environment stemmed naturally from his interest in agriculture, he said. He paraphrases a John Muir quote, which emphasizes the connectivity of the environment: “When one tugs at a single string in nature, he finds it attached to the rest of the world.”  “It’s all connected,” Braasch said. “I’ve found it very fulfilling to be involved in making things better, and do what little I could to conserve our resources.  I was brought up by a Dutch German family where conservation of every penny was demanded!”

Braasch is proud of the “unprecedented” level of research done on water quality in the East Fork watershed, under the auspices of the East Fork Watershed Cooperative. Clermont County took over the operation of a Procter & Gamble stream research facility in Miami Township, on the banks of the East Fork of the Little Miami River, and now leases it to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. The EPA conducts research of the watershed from this facility.

What was originally called the Scientific Advisory Committee has now evolved into a group involving the U.S. EPA, Ohio EPA, USGS, the Army Corps of Engineers, NOAA, several universities, as well as the Clermont County stakeholders such as the Soil & Water Conservation District. “The level of science that’s been brought to the East Fork Little Miami watershed is unprecedented in the United States,” Braasch said. “It’s a little known fact as to how much research, how much expertise has been directed to the East Fork watershed. We were way ahead of our time when we started looking at water quality on a watershed basis and now we’re probably way ahead of most of the country in understanding what drives water quality. We’re learning what we need to do to reduce nutrients and pollutants to our streams.”

Best management practices that farmers are adopting include the use of cover crops and building wetlands on farm property to soak up nutrients. Braasch is convinced that over time, these practices will become widespread and that harmful algal blooms, which have plagued Harsha Lake, as well as the Ohio River, will become less pervasive.

One underappreciated factor in the quality of water in the United States, Braasch said, is something most of us take for granted now: centralized sewer systems. “It used to be people had a pipe to the creek … or maybe a leachfield which evolved to an on-site system. It used to be that the Ohio River was the sewer system,” he said. “Having centralized sewers has been tremendous in improving water quality and our health. These guys who work for the Water Resources Department, putting in sewer pipes and maintaining them … It’s a dirty hard job and they don’t get enough appreciation.”

He’s also proud of the level of recycling that is now done throughout the county. He brought drop-off recycling to the county years ago, but now curbside recycling is gaining popularity. Just in the last year, the Solid Waste District helped Batavia, Ohio and Williamsburg townships secure curbside recycling via waste franchising to over 8,000 households.  “More people are recycling because they know it’s the right thing to do,” he said. “Are we running out of space for landfills? No, it’s a big country. There’s plenty of places we could throw garbage. But it’s such a waste of our money and resources to throw it in there when we can reuse it. And it creates jobs. It doesn’t have to go into a hole in the ground to make a mound that we can’t ever use again.”

Braasch says Clermont County must continue to be vigilant in monitoring the CECOS International hazardous waste facility in Jackson Township, which stopped receiving waste in 1988 and closed in 1997. Clermont County monitors the site, along with the U.S. EPA and Ohio EPA. The hazardous waste site is upstream of Harsha Lake, which supplies some of the county’s water. Braasch was instrumental in negotiating an agreement between CECOS and the county, approved in 2012, that added groundwater monitoring wells at the site.

As he retires, Braasch looks forward, of course, to getting out more in nature – skiing, backpacking and more traveling. Several trips out West are on the itinerary, as well as some skiing in Banff, in the Canadian Rockies.  He loves skiing. “When you’re skiing, you don’t think about anything else but what you’re doing.  If you don’t, you’re gonna get hurt.  And so you’re focused and you forget about everything else around you. It’s soothing and relaxing.”

Hannah Lubbers, who has worked with Braasch for 10 years at the Solid Waste District and OEQ, will become director of both on Feb. 1.